Parsley

Botanical name: Petroselinum crispum

Parsley is a biennial herb from the family Apiaceae (outdated: Umbelliferae) that was already cultivated and used in the ancient and probably originated from southeastern Europe. This herb prefers nutrient-rich, moist soil. Therefore it is recommended to change its location every year. The harvest of parsley can take place all year round. A distinction is made between curly-leaf parsley or flat-leaf parsley and parsley root.

Curly-leaf parsley / flat-leaf parsley

The leaf parsley (convar. crispum) has smooth or curled leaves and is used as a fresh herb. Caution: The flat-leaf parsley can be confused with the poison hemlock (Conium)!

Parsley root

The root parsley (convar. radicosum) is part of greens and, among other things, is used to flavor soups.

Nutrients of parsley

Nutrient Unit Leaf parsley Parsley root
Energy
kcal
53,00
37,00
Carbohydrates
g
7,38
5,39
Protein
g
4,43
4,30
Fat
g
0,40
0,47
Water
g
81,08
84,83
Potassium
mg
1000,00
399,00
Calcium
mg
245,00
39,00
Iron
mg
5,50
0,85
Magnesium
mg
41,00
26,00
Vitamin C
mg
166,00
41,00

More nutrients of parsley

The essential oil (parsley oil), which is responsible for the flavor of parsley, consists primarily of the following components:

Worth mentioning is the content of D-Apiose, a carbohydrate (Pentose) and glutathione, a protein compound (peptide) with 120 mg / kg.

Parsley in the kitchen

Parsley is ideal for freezing. But, drying at too high a temperature can lead to a sulphurous flavor that smells a bit like hay.

Since the flavor of the parsley is lost by strong heat, you should add parsley just before serving. It is usually used to flavor potatoes, salads, soups, vegetables, fish, poultry and egg dishes.

Here you can find a list, which spices / herbs to use with a particular dish.

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» Phytic-acid

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